4-step process to achieving your creative goals every day

4-step process to achieving your

In our already very busy lives, the pressure to do more and perform better seems to grow, even though we stay with the same amount of hours in a day. The to-do lists are getting on popularity with all accompanying tools like apps, digital notebooks and ext. just for you to become more productive. Still, there is an underlying question: we might be able to do more, but with what quality? I am always for quality over quantity, since it is less stressful and you will be more satisfied with the work you’ve done.carnegie

So how you can organize your day, in order to meet all your desired creative goals?

Cut the long to-do list short.

So the first step in this process I would recommend for you to clearly and realistically go through your daily tasks/goals, make priorities and choose only those that are really important.

Define what’s really important to you.

In order to retain that initial drive for accomplishing our goals, it is crucial to focus ourselves on the tasks that serve our purpose, that will benefit us in the long run. Only when you divert your thinking to work on what really matters, you begin to more appreciate your time and what you do with it.

Notice when are your high energy levels.

As everything around us has its cyclic rhythm so do we. Life is made of cycles and seasons so we need to observe ourselves in what part of the day we are most productive. That’s the power we should harness as much as we can. Follow the flow of your own rhythms instead of pedaling against the stream. I’m for example a morning person and I build my daily routine around those pick energy levels to take the maximum advantage of it.

Focus only at one task at the time.

Multitasking is a myth busted long time ago. It’s a deceiving feeling you are getting more things done, while what it does it’s quite the opposite. You might initially do more, but the tiredness and stress that accumulates simply adds up to long-term exhaustion. For many years, I personally was very proud of my multitasking skills. Yes, I managed to do more things, but at the end of the day I was always left with some ’empty’ feeling, like something was missing. And that was strange, because the purpose of the multitasking is to do more things and get that feeling of accomplishment and satisfaction, right? Until several years ago I realized that key source of my stress was that endless try to get everything done, fast and in short period of time. Than I began to declutter my schedule and get more focus on what’s really important. The biggest lesson I learnt is when you approach your obligations, strategically, with end result in mind, your focus will sharpen and your energy won’t get dissipated on meaningless activities. While remaining on doing one thing at the time, completely present in the moment, actually our effectiveness with time can grow, since it allows you to enjoy your work, simply to be immersed in your creativity. In Buddhist traditions, the philosophy is to do everything slowly and deliberately, with complete concentration. Put your mind completely on the task and try to avoid distractions.

If you have big projects, then break them into small pieces and do segment by segment, one step at a time.

How do you spare time for your creativity? Please, share in the comments below.


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10 Comments

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  1. In our busy lives we are so pushed towards quantity over quality. Thanks for highlighting the importance of slowing down and doing things well and deliberately!

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    • Thank you for reading and I know how it’s hard to slow down. It’s like being swallowed by a machine and you can’t get out of it. It’s a habit like anything else we do and the sooner we realize that, the better – before stress takes its toll on us.

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  2. I completely agree. Multi-tasking is not effective and it means you cannot enjoy any of your tasks, as you are constantly distracted and running from one to the next and back again. I used to do this, it caused me a great deal of strain. After I attended a mindfulness course I really started to try and put the Buddhist approach into action. Doing one thing at a time, with intention, with awareness. It is so much more satisfying, so much less tiring and, as a perfectionist at heart, I find I am much more happy with the end result. I remember reading about a Buddhist monk who people would go to visit because of his joy and serenity as he did his job, which was to wash dishes. He was an inspiration to many. We can learn so much from Buddhism. x

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Thanks for this post. It reaffirms what I have decided to incorporate in my life after having an almost nervous breakdown from work stress 6 years ago. I still get sucked into the bad habit every now and then but I’m definitely better, able to get back on track of quality over quantity and on purpose.

    Liked by 1 person

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